Ta​ng​i

Tangi can be expensive, and while money may be the last thing we want to deal with in times of grief usually there is no way round it. However, there is help available and there are ways to minimise the cost. 

Funeral Grant

You may be eligible for help from WINZ if you are either: 
  • the partner, spouse, child, parent or guardian of the deceased person 
  • arranging the funeral of someone with no partner, spouse or child. 
WINZ can help you with necessary costs such as: 
  • professional services for preparing the body for cremation or burial (for example, embalming)
  • the cost of a casket 
  • newspaper notice costs 
  • hearse fees 
  • compulsory fees for buying a burial plot 
  • cremation fees. 
The amount received will depend upon the estate of the deceased as well as other factors. If you are the partner, spouse, parent or guardian it also depends on: 
  • how much you earn 
  • any money or assets you have. 
To find out more visit:
http://www.workandincome.govt.nz/individuals/a-z-benefits/funeral-grant.html 

Tips for keeping the cost of tangi down:

  1. Casket wreath: Don’t feel that you need a fancy flower display for your loved one. Why not try and personalise it – this can be much more meaningful than buying a standard wreath. Click here for ideas. 

  2. Shop Around: If you are going to use a funeral director consider your options before you choose one. Often when people pick a funeral home they stay with the familiar – either because they have been there before or it’s close to their house. However, unless you have a reason for believing this particular funeral home is offering you a service you are happy with (and a price you can afford) you should shop around. To make it easier, some funeral providers even put their prices online. 

  3. Caskets: There can be large mark ups on caskets. Make sure you get one for a reasonable price. 

  4. Take a moment: Once the funeral director has given you a price list, don't feel pressured into making an immediate decision. You should discuss this with your whānau first by either taking the list away with you or at least asking the funeral director for a few minutes alone to consider your choices.